Menu

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CONFERENCE

"See Rock City: The Power of Place as Origin, Home, or Destination"

April 6-8, 2017 

Covenant College 

Lookout Mountain, GA

Travelers in our region are accustomed to passing signs inviting them to “See Rock City.” The familiar signs provoke reactions ranging from nostalgia through tolerance to annoyance at the interruption of the landscape. Each of these reactions registers a sense of place and the importance place has for human beings. SECCL invites the submission of papers exploring the literary power of place understood or experienced as origin, home, or destination. Appropriate submissions might include papers on Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Neil Gaiman’s American Gods, which feature Rock City; they might also consider Wendell Berry’s Port William, Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead, Robert Frost’s New England, Shakespeare’s London (or his Venice); or they might focus on a journey such as Abraham’s or Odysseus’s or Bilbo Baggins’s “there and back again.”

 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CONFERENCE

"Walker Percy Centennial: Pilgrimage in Literature"

April 28-30, 2016
Montreat College
Montreat, North Carolina

Keynote Speakers: Farrell O'Gorman, Belmont Abbey College & Jim Wildeman, Covenant College (Emeritus)

Literary characters often seek relationship with the God of the Bible. They feel detached from affairs in the material world. Pilgrims sense a call from God to pursue him spite of the unbelief surrounding the characters.

Essays will be considered from a variety of authors. Topics should pursue the intersection of faith and literature. Creative writing presentations are welcome.

 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CONFERENCE

"It's Only Natural(ism): Questioning and Responding to the Master Narrative of Late Modernity"

April 9-11, 2015
Charleston Southern University
Charleston, South Carolina

Keynote Speaker: Roger Lundin, Wheaton College

Undergraduates thrilling to the bleak despair of Stephen Crane or Thomas Hardy are often excited to discover the existence of naturalism as a philosophy of life and a literary movement of great importance. They are quick to draw parallels to contemporary issues and controversies, for naturalism’s reach is clearly not confined to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Christian philosophers such as Alvin Plantinga and Charles Taylor have identified naturalism, the belief that natural phenomena alone can explain human experience, as the defining feature of late modernity, and Plantinga has invoked naturalism’s status as a quasi-religion to reframe the supposed debate between science and religion: “there is a science-religion-conflict, all right, but it is between science and naturalism, not science and theistic religion.” Philosophical naturalism’s influence extends beyond the bounds of literary naturalism or science-and-religion discourse, surfacing even in theories of language, as Charles Taylor and Roger Lundin have argued. Across the disciplines, is naturalism a “master narrative” towards which postmodernity (if such a thing exists) has failed to be incredulous? Is naturalism, more than postmodernism, the contemporary challenge to both religion and science?

 
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CONFERENCE

"Imagining Paradise"


April 3-5, 2014

Palm Beach Atlantic Unviersity

Palm Beach, Florida

Located on the Intracoastal Waterway about one mile from the coastline of Palm Beach Island, Palm Beach Atlantic University will host the 2014 southeastern regional meeting of the CCL and presents as its theme, "Imagining Paradise."

Paradise is a subject that has stirred the imaginations of writers for millennia while simultaneously exceeding the scope of artistic representation itself. Poets, playwrights, and novelists have been inspired to describe in various ways that which is indescribable. Language can only approximate visions of paradise occasioned by mystical experiences such as spiritual awakenings, ecstasies, and epiphanies. Conference organizers invite papers that explore how literary artists imagine paradise, from abstract images of height and light to concrete images of sublime mountain peaks and lush seascapes. Papers are also welcome that investigate literary depictions of paradise's dark opposite, hell, and its penitential proving grounds, purgatory. Papers with Blakean ambitions might even explore convergences between heaven and hell.